Rebecca Cadigan

Rebecca Cadigan

PhD Candidate in Health Policy (G9, Medical Sociology)
Rebecca Orfaly Cadigan graduated from Bates College with a BS in Psychology. She received departmental honors for her senior thesis entitled “Apparent Neglect of Statistical Power in Split-Plot Designs”. Upon graduation, Rebecca worked at New England Research Institutes in Watertown, Massachusetts from 1998 to 2003, serving as data manager and later promoted to senior research associate for several international multi-site cardiology studies, including the SHOCK Trial and the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry. Rebecca earned a Master of Science degree in Health and Social Behavior from Harvard School of Public Health in 2003. From 2003 to 2008, she served as program manager for the CDC-funded Center for Public Health Preparedness at Harvard School of Public Health, where she had the opportunity to work with Dr. Howard Koh and a multidisciplinary team of investigators on a range of initiatives to advanced disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Rebecca has spent considerable time in the field, working with health care and public health systems throughout New England and Europe on disaster planning, hazard vulnerability analysis, and workforce development. Rebecca has also been involved in policy research related to disasters, on topics including disaster planning for vulnerable populations, altered standards of care during mass casualty incidents, and the establishment of criteria and metrics for assessing emergency preparedness in the context of simulated drills and exercises. She has coauthored several publications on the public health and societal consequences of disasters, including a chapter on social capital and disasters in Social Capital and Health (Kawachi I, Subramanian SV, & Kim D [Eds]). Rebecca’s research interests center on the social, economic, and geographic predictors of long-term care utilization. More specifically, she aims to explore (1) the macroeconomic factors influencing the setting in which elders receive long-term care; (2) contextual and compositional effects and long-term care; and (3) the relationship between regional variation in health care and long-term care utilization.

Concentration

Dissertation Committee Member